Partner and Family Visas
Partner and Family visas allow the partner, spouse, or family of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia.

Parent Visas

Parents of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen may be able to migrate to Australia.
There are two categories of parent visa subclasses, contributory, and non-contributory. Non-contributory parent visas have a low processing priority with the Australian government and based on current planning levels, the Department of Home Affairs website advises anyone considering applying for a non-contributory parent visa faces a wait of up to 30 years. With this in mind, most prospective parent visa applicants consider the more expensive contributory parent visa options on offer. The contributory parent visa subclasses are:

● The subclass 173 temporary visa, or the subclass 143 permanent visa, available to parents of any age.
● The subclass 884 temporary visa, and 864 permanent visa, available to those of pension age.

There is an option here to apply for the temporary visa first, and then after two years transition to the permanent visa where the higher application fee will be payable. The benefit is the staggering of the costs.

The subclass 870 Temporary Sponsored Parent Visa is a separate type of parent visa, as it is temporary only. It does not present any age requirements for the applicant and it is not a contributory parent visa. The 870 visa requires the Australian sponsor to be approved before the parent can proceed to lodge the Visa.
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To be granted a visa in the Parent category, generally you must have a child who is settled in Australia and is an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible NZ citizen. You must also pass the “Balance of Family” test, which is to demonstrate that half or more of your children reside in Australia, or more of your children reside in Australia than in any other country. One of the children will need to act as a sponsor for the visa, and it is a requirement that the child be ‘settled’. Excluding a few exceptions, children are generally required to have lived in Australia for at least 2 years to be considered settled.

If applying for the subclass 870 Temporary Sponsored Parent Visa, parents are not required to meet the ‘balance of family ’test. They will however need to be sponsored by a child who has been settled in Australia and is an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible NZ citizen for at least 4 years and has a minimum household taxable income of $83,454.80.
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Some Parent Visa categories can only be lodged as a Paper application to the relevant Immigration office.

Migration Ways provides assistance with all Parent visa categories and will advise on both the sponsor and visa applicant requirements, and where and how the application must be submitted.
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Partner Visas

Allows the partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia.
You may be eligible for a partner visa if you and your partner:

● Are married.
● Are engaged to be married.
● Are in a de facto relationship.
● Have registered your relationship with a relevant State/Territory authority.
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There are three pathways through which partners of Australian Citizens or Permanent Residents can obtain a visa for Australia. The most suitable visa option will depend on your individual circumstances, including whether the person applying for the visa is inside or outside Australia at the time of application. Migration Ways can help you select the option best suited to your requirements, and formulate a strategy which allows you and your partner to feel secure in the knowledge that the migration process will be as stress-free as possible.

● The Subclass 820/801 Onshore Partner Visa: This visa is available to those who are married to, or in a de facto relationship with, an Australian Permanent Resident or Citizen, or eligible NZ Citizen. An applicant for this visa must bein Australia. The initial stage, the subclass 820, requires that you have been in a de facto relationship with your partner for 12 months, be married, or have registered your relationship with a relevant State/Territory authority. Two years from the date of application for the subclass 820 visa, the applicant is invited to submit evidence that the relationship is continuing, to allow DOHA to process the permanent stage, the Subclass 801 visa. An applicant is entitled to Medicare access, work rights, and study rights, upon grant of the temporary 820 visa.

The Subclass 309/100 Offshore Partner Visa: This visa is available to those who are married to, or in a de facto relationship with, an Australian Permanent Resident or Citizen, or an eligible New Zealand Citizen. This pathway is for applicants who are outside of Australia. An applicant must be outside of Australia when the temporary Subclass 309 visa is granted, after which they can enter Australia, and access Medicare, work rights and study rights. In much the same way as the onshore process outlined above, the applicant will initially be granted a Subclass 309 visa, and will be given the opportunity to obtain the permanent visa, the Subclass100, two years from the date the initial application was submitted.

Subclass300 (Temporary Residence) - Prospective Marriage Visa: This visa is available to those who are engaged to be married to an Australian Permanent Resident or Citizen, or an eligible New Zealand Citizen. This pathway is for applicants who are outside of Australia. Once granted, the subclass 309 visa allows the holder to enter Australia and marry their Australian partner within a nine-month period. Prior to the end of this nine-month period, applicants can apply for an onshore Subclass 820/801 visa as outlined above. This visa allows holders to access work and study rights.
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All of the above visa options will require evidence that your relationship is genuine and continuing. You should be able to provide evidence that addresses the following: 

● Cohabitation.
● Financial interdependence.
● Social interdependence.
● The nature of your ongoing commitment to one another.

At Migration Ways, we understand that all couples are different and will assist you in compiling the most relevant evidence of your individual relationship.
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